Accepting IVF

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It may sound crazy to the fertile ear, but deciding to start reproductive treatment was a massive decision for us. Our first IVF cycle was a full three years after we sat hand-in-hand on the couch and decided to try and bring new life into the world.

It seems almost crazy to look back on. If you get diagnosed with practically any other disease you just suck it up and start treatment. But, as usual, infertility seems to work differently.

Of course there were massive financial connotations, but that wasn’t the major thing that held us back – having a child was worth more than money could buy. No, deciding to start treatment meant conceding that something was very, very wrong. Beginning IVF meant swallowing the thought that we weren’t special enough for a random, unexpected miracle, unlike your cousin’s neighbour’s cat’s friend who fell pregnant despite all the odds.

There were also moral issues. We desperately wanted Egg and Sperm to work things out and meet somewhere in the middle, but what if we ended up with 10 embryos shivering in storage?

How could something so precious and longed for suddenly become disposable? We asked around. Some people told us that IVF was a sin; others suggested that it was forcing God’s hand to do something unnatural. Others were beautifully and wholeheartedly supportive.

We were young, conflicted, tired and broken.

The doctors laughed at us when we asked to attempt the more ‘ethical’ GIFT program. GIFT will never work for you, they sneered. I counted nine friends who were first time preggars around me. It all felt like a cruel joke.

Eventually we came to what we thought was an ethical compromise: we would just get a few embryos made up at the one time and freeze the rest of the eggs. It seemed perfect; eggs are disposable, embryos are not. We settled on the number 6 because it left room for a reasonable amount of failure, but also an adequate likelihood of success.

The doctors responded to us like we were mental patients (probably because they foresaw us throwing a lot of money down the drain) but they eventually obliged. One Doctor told us that she couldn’t tell us what our chances were because there were no statistics for couples under 25. Another remarked that our chance of naturally conceiving was so low Woman’s Day would publish a story about it. We got used to being the youngest people in the waiting room.

The decision to fertilise only 6 eggs – if 6 were even collected – seemed so wise at the time, but in hindsight it was yet another decision made with rose-coloured, youthful, ignorant optimism.

For our first cycle they suctioned a massive 19 eggs out of me, and while my friends enjoyed an Australia Day BBQ, I, at 23 years old, lay in bed with hyper stimulation fears and unbridled hope in my heart.

Today is not the day to go into the nitty gritty of what happened for us and why it didn’t work, today I just wanted to show that it’s often not as easy as ‘just go and do IVF.’

There are financial, moral and relational issues to work through. You have to decide whether your workplace will be understanding or not – I had to quit my job to start treatment. You have to work out who to tell and who not to. There are needles and prodding and, quite possibly, pessaries. Your inconsolable and erratic baby hormones are exacerbated a hundred- fold. Friends will tell you that they accidentally fell pregnant after – wait for it – having sex! Sex will become associated with failure. Doctors will treat you like incompetent cattle. You will have to get a police check and counselling to be allowed to do something that heroin addicts can do thoughtlessly.

But…You will survive. You will get through it. You will become stronger. You may even be rewarded with a miraculous gift. Countless women have gone before you and survived. You will too.

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